Begins: October 29, 2018
Ends: June 29, 2019

Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN: Marginal Syllabus 2018-19

Literacy, Equity + Remarkable Notes = LEARN is a collaborative project of the National Writing Project (NWP), National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and Marginal Syllabus which invites both K-12 and post-secondary educators to a year of social reading, collaborative web annotation, and public conversation.

Marginal Syllabus partners include a range of authors, educators, scholars, and learners alike alongside a publisher, NCTE, to engage in curated social reading and writing opportunities that explore the intersections of literacy and equity. As a marginal syllabus comprised of eight texts, we seek to surface a range of remarkable notes in the margins of these text, while also centering our focus on topics and scholarship that often are on the margins of teaching and learning. This syllabus has been collaboratively organized by its partners and all 19 partner authors have agreed to have their scholarship publicly annotated by participating educators.

This project leverages the web annotation platform Hypothesis for open collaboration and dialogue, adding multiple voices to critical conversations about equity, literacy, and learning.

How it works:

  • LEARN will kick off the last week of October and run through June.
  • Each month, a new reading will be posted online and a link to the annotatable text will be featured in this syllabus document (except in October as we start at the end of the month and continue that first conversation through November).
  • Related events happening that month will also be announced. CLTV broadcasts will be aired at educatorinnovator.org; follow @innovates_ed and #marginalsyllabus to keep abreast of these opportunities. NCTE will publicize each month’s event via INBOX, its member newsletter.
  • We encourage your participation in the annotation conversation each month, and readings will remain online as openly accessible resources for ongoing reference, annotation, and discussion.
  • We also encourage you to use these readings and the opportunity to annotate however it best works for you—organize a study group, invite a class of learners you are teaching, engage as an individual, or connect it to a meeting or course.

Get Started with Online Annotation via Hypothesis

hypothesis logoAnnotation is the act of commenting and/or otherwise marking up a set of texts in order to add to your reading and/or keep track of your thinking. As an open online tool, Hypothesis adds a new dimension to your reading and note-taking, making it publicly available and therefore socially shared.

Using Hypothesis is as easy as clicking on this activated link to the texts shared below. From there you can see and read all public annotations left by others; Join/login to Hypothesis to add your own annotations. You can also use Hypothesis more regularly to annotate other online content; visit the website to learn how. There are also resources for educators for those considering using this in a course or other learning situation.


LEARN: 2018-19 Marginal Syllabus

Click on the links below to activate the annotatable version of these readings (used with permission); connect with us during live events or browse the event archives.

Dates Article for Annotation Conversation
(Note: links to articles will be available here when event begins)
Related Events
Oct 29 Electing to Heal: Trauma, Healing, and Politics in Classrooms

Partner authors: Antero Garcia and Elizabeth Dutro

Journal: English Education

Garcia, A., & Dutro, E. (2018). Electing to Heal: Trauma, Healing, and Politics in Classrooms. English Education, 50(4), 375-383.

Oct 30: Author discussion @ CLTV

NCTE 2018 Conference:

  • Hallway conversations and “liminal” annotations (Saturday, 11/17)
  • Presentation: The Marginal Syllabus: Educators Annotating the Web as Professional Development about Educational Equity (Sunday, 11/18, 10:30–11:45a)
Dec 3 What’s Radical about Youth Writing?: Seeing and Honoring Youth Writers and Their Literacies

Partner author: Marcelle M. Haddix

Journal: Voices From the Middle

Haddix, M. M. (2018). What’s Radical about Youth Writing?: Seeing and Honoring Youth Writers and Their Literacies. Voices From the Middle, 25(3), 8-12.

Dec 6: Author discussion @ CLTV
Jan 7 Generative Principles for Professional Learning for Equity-Oriented Urban English Teachers

Partner authors: Allison Skerrett, Amber Warrington, and Thea Williamson

Journal: English Education

Skerrett, A., Warrington, A., & Williamson, T. (2018). Generative principles for professional learning for equity-oriented urban English teachers. English Education, 50(2), 116-146.

Jan 8: Author discussion @ CLTV
Feb 4 When School Is Not Enough: Understanding the Lives and Literacies of Black Youth

Partner authors: Valerie Kinloch, Tanja Burkhard, and Carlotta Penn

Journal: Research in the Teaching of English

Kinloch, V., Burkhard, T., & Penn, C. (2017). When School Is Not Enough: Understanding the Lives and Literacies of Black Youth. Research in the Teaching of English, 52(1), 34-54.

Feb 5: Author discussion @ CLTV
March 4 Critical Indigenous Literacies: Selecting and Using Children’s Books about Indigenous Peoples

Partner author: Debbie Reese

Journal: Language Arts

Reese, D. (2018). Critical Indigenous Literacies: Selecting and Using Children’s Books about Indigenous Peoples. Language Arts, 95(6), 389-393.

March 5: Author discussion @ CLTV
April 1 Cultivating Urban Literacies on Chicago’s South Side through a Pedagogy of Spatial Justice

Partner authors: Andrea Vaughan, Rebecca Woodard, Nathan C. Phillips, and Kara Taylor

Journal: Voices From the Middle

Vaughan, A., Woodard, R., Phillips, N. C., & Taylor, K. (2018). Cultivating Urban Literacies on Chicago’s South Side through a Pedagogy of Spatial Justice. Voices From the Middle, 25(3), 26-29.

April 2: Author discussion @ CLTV
May 6 “We Are Not Dirt”: Freirean Counternarratives and Rhetorical Literacies for Student Voice in Schooling

Partner authors: Everardo Pedraza and R. Joseph Rodríguez

Journal: English Journal

Pedraza, E., & Rodríguez, R. J. (2018). “We Are Not Dirt”: Freirean Counternarratives and Rhetorical Literacies for Student Voice in Schooling. English Journal, 107, 75-81.

May 7: Author discussion @ CLTV
June 3 Even Cinderella Is White: (Re)Centering Black Girls’ Voices as Literacies of Resistance

Partner authors: Jemimah L. Young, Marquita D. Foster, and Dorothy Hines

Journal: nglish JournalE

Young, J. L., Foster, M. D., & Hines, D. E. (2018). Even Cinderella Is White:(Re) Centering Black Girls’ Voices as Literacies of Resistance. English Journal, 107(6), 102-108.

June 4: Author discussion @ CLTV


About Marginal Syllabus
Started in 2016, the Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversations with educators about issues of equity in teaching, learning, and education. The project’s name, design, and learning opportunities are intentional references to interpretations of the word marginal: the Marginal Syllabus collaborates with authors whose writing is contrary, or marginal, to dominant education norms; the Marginal Syllabus hosts and curates publicly accessible conversations among educators that occur in the margins of online texts using open and collaborative web annotation; and the Marginal Syllabus supports educator collaboration via the open-source web annotation technology Hypothesis, a tool that is marginal to commercial edtech. The Marginal Syllabus is a multi-stakeholder partnership among educators, the National Writing Project, the National Council of Teachers of English, Hypothesis, authors and publishers of scholarship, and educational researchers.

Partners

National Writing Project

The National Writing Project (NWP), the founder of the Educator Innovator Initiative, is a network of educators and dedicated practitioners working together to improve practice with an eye toward young people as producers. The NWP envisions a future where every person is an accomplished writer and maker, not just a passive consumer.

National Council of Teachers of English

Through collaboration and community, shared stories and shared experiences, NCTE supports teachers and their students in classrooms, on college campuses, and in online learning environments.

hypothes.is

hypothes.is is an online annotation platform and a nonprofit advocating for open standards in web annotation. hypothes.is collaborates with educators to make use of annotation technology in the classroom and help students become critical readers and knowledge producers on the open web.